The Technical Center

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Textile Resource for Specialty Fabrics and Product Innovation
   May 26, 2024  Facebook Twitter
APPAREL TRENDS - PGA Show 2024 - Development of Neolast

The Celanese Corporation, a global specialty materials and chemical company, and Under Armour, a global leader and innovator in athletic apparel and footwear, announced the development of Neolast™ fiber for performance stretch fabrics.  The innovative material will offer a high-performing, more sustainable alternative to elastane spandex, and could provide opportunities to recycle performance stretch fabrics.  The Celanese Neolast™ elastoester fiber process eliminates hazardous substances typically used to produce spandex/elastane stretch fabrics.  With Under Armour as its partner, the launch of Neolast™ provides a new and exciting innovation for the textile/apparel industry, aligning their value chains to achieve mutual circular manufacturing goals!

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Arieal View
Functional Fabric Fair 2023 The crowd at Functional Fabric Fair Fall 2023

The Functional Fabric Fair 2023

Fair's Fall '23 trade show in Portland completed a successful run with an increase in both exhibitor and attendance participation. This premier trade and sourcing event, powered by Performance Days, is the exclusive US trade show dedicated to high performance functional fabrics. The fall edition, held at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, November 1-2, featured over 265 suppliers, marking the largest in its 4-year US history. The event showcased the latest in textile development trends for the outdoor market, and unveiled groundbreaking textile innovations for Autumn/Winter 2025.

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FEATURED VIDEOS                                               
APPAREL ARTICLE

Activewear eliminates sweat with volcanic sand - Boulder, Colo.-based company 37.5® Technology has harnessed particles of volcanic minerals and activated carbon from coconuts to create thermoregulating fabrics used in athleisure wear.

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MIT dataset helps predict biodegradable polyesters - Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) used machine learning to analyze a library of 642 polyesters and polycarbonates and predict how they biodegrade, based on their chemical structure and results from tests using the bacteria P. lemoignei.

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APPAREL NEWS & VIEWS
This fabric recycling company was going to change fashion. Why did it suddenly go bankrupt? Renewcell created tech to turn old cotton clothing into pulp for new fabric. But shortly after opening its first large factory, it has already stopped operating. Read more…

Sustainability in denim The staple fabric is slowly changing its production to be as sustainable as its consumer appeal. Read more…

Flexible device could monitor muscle injuries using nanomagnets The stretchable, durable device converts muscle movement into electrical signals that can be transmitted to a smartphone app for personalized injury rehabilitation. Read more…

How collaborative projects may change the future of textiles Manufacturing smart textile technologies requires adopting new materials and methods, smoother and more extensive innovation-production connections, and a technically skilled workforce. Read more…

Women entrepreneurs use bras in women’s health initiatives Women entrepreneurs are working to tackle some of the most daunting medical conditions women face, and the world of textiles is leading the charge. Read more…

Textile-based device delivers haptic feedback Researchers at Rice University in Houston, Texas have created a wearable, textile-based device that transmits haptic feedback, reducing the need for external hardware. Read more…

Kraig Biocraft Laboratories announces creation of production-ready spider silk hybrid: BAM 1 BAM 1 is the result of selective breeding to maximize both robustness and the ratio of usable silk per cocoon. Read more…

FEATURED PRESENTATIONS
eVent Bio
ConceptIII
Supporting Brands
ZYIA
Chemours - Teflon
MMI Textiles
Draper Knitting Company
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